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Multimedia: Media and Copyright

Public Performance Rights

Public Performance Rights (PPR) are rights that legally allow a person to show a film in public without seeking permission from the copyright holder. Some of the library's DVDs and VHS tapes have PPR, but many do not. Films in the library's collection that do not have PPR are limited to individual viewing and classroom use only.

Situations where one must obtain PPR to show a film include but are not limited to public showings on or off campus, screenings at Registered Student Organization events, guest lectures, and film series. PPR are required even if the event is free.

PPR are not required for individual viewing or for screening a film in a face-to-face classroom, in support of a class, as part of the university curriculum.

If your Registered Student Organization or campus office has questions about viewing one of the library's films for a campus event, please contact the multimedia librarian at anne.shelley@ilstu.edu.

Creative Commons

Creative Commons is an organization that enables and encourages the sharing and use of your work and others' works through free legal tools. CC offers a set of licenses that you can choose from to assign to your work. Whenever you create something, you own the copyrights to it (unless you have signed a legally-binding document that transferred one or more of your copyrights to someone else). Applying a Creative Commons license to your work and sharing it online allows others to reuse your work to make their own work. You choose from a variety of conditions that people must agree to if they want to use your work -- and you decide on those conditions. Likewise, if you are looking for a royalty-free song to use in a video you're making, or if you found some great presentation slides on SlideShare that you'd like to repurpose, check to see if those resources have a Creative Commons license. If they do, follow the conditions set by the authors and repurpose their wokr as your own!

Creative Commons does not replace copyright... it complements U.S. Copyright Law and helps make work more shareable. Before you license your work using CC, make sure it is copyrightable (not a fact or idea, not in the public domain) and that you actually own the copyright (it is your original creative work).

Read more about Creative Commons on their website: http://creativecommons.org/.

 
Types of licenses offered by Creative Commons
(text taken from http://creativecommons.org/licenses/):
 

Attribution 
CC BY

This license lets others distribute, remix, tweak, and build upon your work, even commercially, as long as they credit you for the original creation. This is the most accommodating of licenses offered. Recommended for maximum dissemination and use of licensed materials.

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Attribution-ShareAlike 
CC BY-SA

This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon your work even for commercial purposes, as long as they credit you and license their new creations under the identical terms. This license is often compared to “copyleft” free and open source software licenses. All new works based on yours will carry the same license, so any derivatives will also allow commercial use. This is the license used by Wikipedia, and is recommended for materials that would benefit from incorporating content from Wikipedia and similarly licensed projects.

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Attribution-NoDerivs 
CC BY-ND

This license allows for redistribution, commercial and non-commercial, as long as it is passed along unchanged and in whole, with credit to you.

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Attribution-NonCommercial 
CC BY-NC

This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon your work non-commercially, and although their new works must also acknowledge you and be non-commercial, they don’t have to license their derivative works on the same terms.

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Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 
CC BY-NC-SA

This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon your work non-commercially, as long as they credit you and license their new creations under the identical terms.

View License Deed | View Legal Code

Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 
CC BY-NC-ND

This license is the most restrictive of our six main licenses, only allowing others to download your works and share them with others as long as they credit you, but they can’t change them in any way or use them commercially.