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TCH 204 - Introduction to Elementary Education

Welcome!

This guide was made to assist you in your Group Issue Research Assignment. It has six main components:

Guidance to narrowing your current issue into something appropriate for this assignment. 

University of British Columbia Library's explanation of scholarly sources, popular sources, and trade sources. As well as a visual made by me depicting a simplified view of the peer-review process. 

An introduction to the different search strategies often employed in academic databases, including keywords and subject headings. 

A video introduction/recap to using ERIC Ebsco and ERIC Ovid to discover education journal articles, as well as links to helpful education-focused databases. 

A series of links for education data sets organized by national-focus or Illinois-focus, originally curated by Sarah French. 

A visual guiding how you might interrogate resources that you find in order to use them critically. 

Assignment Description

Group Issues Research Project (Objectives: 2, 8, 9)

An important aspect of this course is the understanding of educational issues and how they impact a teacher’s work in the classroom. A significant issues research project is required. Working in small groups of 3 to 4, students will research a current educational issue.

These elements must be addressed in the research project:

  • The pertinent history of this issue
  • Important parties and their roles
  • The current state of the issue - current resources should be used
  • Current effect on students and their education
  • The future of this issue

Documentary Style Presentation of Your Research Findings:

  • Pretend you are the expert on this issue.  Present your research to the class in a 7.5 to 8.5 (max) documentary on this topic.  This presentation must be a synthesis of the information you have learned from your research. Each group member should speak to the section of the paper that they have written about.  You are being assessed on your knowledge and delivery of the content.  Although graphics and how you choose to use technology will add to the overall aesthetic appeal of the project, points will not be deducted for providing a simple recording of group members engaged in conversation. If you choose to enhance projects with the use of visual or auditory aids, please make sure that proper attribution is given in the credits. Be sure to follow US Copyright laws for Fair Usehttps://www.copyright.gov/title17/92chap1.html#107
  • The movie should be between 7.5 and 8.5 minutes at the max. If it’s too long, it is not necessary to cut out information; say it in a different way. Think of this as a 20-page research paper condensed into a 7.5-to 8.5 minutes. Credits, sounds, title pages, etc. should be factored into the 8.5 minutes max time.
  • A separate list of resources and references pertaining to this educational issue. A minimum of 10 resources is required. Some are expected to be research-based/peer-reviewed. Citations in APA format must be included in the script. This is evidence of your research. Quotation marks should denote every direct quote. Use in-text citation format: (Author(s), year); or (Author(s), year, p.# or para. #) for direct quotes in each frame. (If it’s not your work, provide the source!)

Submission Requirements

All groups will submit a digital file (.wmv or .mp4mov) of their movie, a reference list, and group member evaluations on the first day of movie presentations. One member from each group will post their movie to the assigned screening room and submit the reference list to his/her shared Dropbox folder.  As an option for the day of presentation, group members may provide the instructor with a link to a Vimeo or YouTube video.  However, a .wmv or .mp4mov should still be provided to the instructor.

Screening Room Review Requirements

Each student will also complete a peer review of each movie in the selected screening room. In addition, each student will compose two questions that can be asked during the café circle discussion held on the day of finals. These questions will serve to demonstrate the student’s thoughtful reflection after viewing the movie and his/her ability to make connections to the course content. Peer evaluation forms can be found on the course and screening room wikis.

(Note: Photo Story 3, a free program, can be used to create the movie on a Windows PC.  No other equipment is necessary as the program uses still images, photographs or images retrieved online, to create a movie.  A mic is necessary to record the narration. This program is loaded to all the COE lab machines. Mics are available for use in the main lab. Mac computers come equipped with iMovie. Workers in Studio TEACH are able and willing to assist you in making your movie. Please check for any related COVID restrictions that may impact how assistance is provided.  As an alternative, groups may also record a rehearsed Zoom session for the documentary.)

Teaching and Learning Librarian

Caitlin Stewart's picture
Caitlin Stewart
Contact:
Milner Library: Office 614C
(309) 438 - 3442
Website